When people ask me “What are you?”, my first reaction is to hope they’re not asking it in horror (“What ARE you?!).  Luckily, that rarely happens after my first cup of morning coffee.  After that, I assume they’re asking what my heritage is.  I am a proud German-American chick, with German blood on both sides of my family.  I even took 3 years of the language in high school, which taught me important lessons like “I like Sabine’s trousers,” and “Georg works at the garden hose factory .”  Such conversation starters, and oh-so-helpful when we moved to Germany–not.

Kaiserslautern Gasthaus
Ah, the traditional German buildings in the Marktplatz. How I miss it!

One of the things that came easily to me when we moved was that the food was very familiar.  I grew up eating pretty traditional German fare like Weisswursts, Leberkas, Landjagers, and Kaffeekuche (white veal wursts, the German version of bologna, dried sausage jerky, and coffee cake). I was so proud to walk into the local Metzgerei (butcher shop) and recognize everything in the meat case, and even know how to order it properly.  I thought I knew it all when it came to German food.  I mean, after all, I AM German.

Pfft.  Silly American.  I had a lot to learn!

One of the dishes that I was introduced to our first Spring in Germany was Spargel.  What the heck is Spargel, you ask?  It’s white asparagus.  Think I’m making this up?  Nope!  It’s a real thing, and you’re about to get schooled in why you should seek it out and add it to your Spring menu.

Spargel Stand
Spargel in Springtime–A German Tradition

In the Springtime, restaurants across Germany are filled with various dishes using this seasonal specialty.  The stalks kind of look like the green asparagus we’re all used to, but admittedly look more like creepy white skeleton fingers.  Appetizing, I know.  But stay with me.  The flavor of this version of these Spring stalks is milder than the green variety, and even has a sweetness depending on how you cook it.  It’s delicate, and is something I miss desperately about Germany, especially this time of year.

So…come Easter it was time to bust out the Spargel recipes and try my hand at my favorite recipe for enjoying this ingredient–soup.  It’s creamy, delicate, luscious, and just plain beautiful in taste and texture.  I invite you to dive in and enjoy this Spring rite of passage for us German-type-folks, and enjoy this delicacy while it lasts.  Spargelsuppe (or White Asparagus Soup, if you can’t pronounce it) will become one of your favorite Spring dishes, too.

Es ist ausgezeichnet (It is outstanding)!

White Asparagus Soup (aka Spargelsuppe)

Spargel Soup
Spargelsuppe--White Asparagus Soup
Print Recipe
There are so many things to miss about Germany. And I'm trying to find recipes for and make many of those memories. This one was so easy, I can't believe I waited so long to try making it. It's simple, beautiful, and so delicious your guests will be pleased and amazed at your culinary knowledge and prowess. Just tell them "danke schoen".
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-40 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-40 minutes
Spargel Soup
Spargelsuppe--White Asparagus Soup
Print Recipe
There are so many things to miss about Germany. And I'm trying to find recipes for and make many of those memories. This one was so easy, I can't believe I waited so long to try making it. It's simple, beautiful, and so delicious your guests will be pleased and amazed at your culinary knowledge and prowess. Just tell them "danke schoen".
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-40 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 people 10 minutes
Cook Time
30-40 minutes
Instructions
  1. Trim white asparagus by cutting off bottom inch of stalks. Dice the asparagus into 2 inch pieces. Dice onions to similar size.
    Spargel and Asparagus
  2. Heat olive oil in large dutch oven or soup pot over medium high heat. Saute onions until softened, but not browned, about 8 minutes. Add asparagus slices and saute for 5 minutes, or until coated with olive oil and beginning to turn translucent.
    Garlic & Onions
  3. Add broth to cover asparagus and onions. Bring to a boil. Lower heat to medium low and simmer, uncovered, for 30-40 minutes or until asparagus is tender. The asparagus should be able to be easily pierced by a fork.
    Spargelsuppe
  4. Using an immersion blender, blend the soup until a smooth texture develops. Add creme fraiche and blend until incorporated.
    White Asparagus Soup
  5. Serve topped with chives or green asparagus tips.
    White Asparagus Soup with Chives
Recipe Notes

Oh, the list of things I miss about Germany is long.  The weather (yes, I like four distinct seasons, and they have that), the easy access to travel, the people, and of course the food.  If you have never seen Spargel, you may have to check out farmer's markets as Spring produce continues to bloom, or investigate the inventory at a specialty store.  Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or here in Texas, Central Market all have these beautiful white stalks.

Note that this recipe works just as well with regular green asparagus.  Just note that the flavor, while still delicate, will be a bit more pungent than the white variety.  But if you can find it, you are in for a treat!  Spargelsuppe will delight you and your guests for sure!

(One more picture?  I'm feeling nostalgic, so naturlich!)

Kaiserslautern Marktplatz
Who wants "ein bier"? I do! I do!

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